1800 954 294
Contact us
Join now
A hand holding a phone, which reflects background lights.

In theory, being connected to the internet gives you access to virtually unlimited information (credible and not so credible), products from all over the world, services, courses, videos and much much more.

But often websites are developed without considering that many members of our community live with disability and have different needs when it comes to accessing digital sources.

This starts with more cosmetic elements – such as font size, spacing and colour selection (for example, avoid white text on light colours) – and extends to building the back end of a website to allow users to engage with the page in a variety of ways, including with the support of assistive technology.

So, what makes websites more accessible? Here are three key elements:

  1. Alt text: this is the written description of what can be seen in a picture and gets picked up by screen readers if users have a vision impairment.
  2. Audio captioning: for meetings and presentations, use programs that offer live captioning, and caption all recordings and videos on your social media channels and website.
  3. Links: wherever possible, make links meaningful so they convey clearly what you will find at the link (rather than including links that have a lot of random letters, symbols and numbers) – this is more user friendly for users with screen readers, and also makes navigation easier for users skimming to find the right information.

About to build a new website and unsure of how to make it accessible to everyone? Well, lucky for you a group of digital experts has developed extensive Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) that you can access – so make sure you take a look at the guidelines to maximise accessibility of your website. It’s much easier to build a website with those guidelines in mind, rather than retrofitting them.

But it’s not just websites – daily communication tools such as documents, spreadsheets and emails also need to be accessible. You can use Microsoft’s ‘Check accessibility’ button to see how you can improve the accessibility of those assets, and there are free web-based services that check colour contrast and how to improve it.

Digital accessibility is so much more than just having access to the internet via a computer or smart device. It’s about being able to access what’s online based on your individual needs – and even if we’re not web developers, we can play our part in making the online experience better for all.

Featured: My Community

Art for everyone

Great art makes the audience feel something – and for collaborators Grace Colsey (they/them) and Jaziel ‘Jazz’ Siegertsz (he/him), they want their audience to feel seen, connected and inspired.

Ready to work

Disability Employment Service providers support people with disability to prepare for employment, find a job and work towards succeeding in their chosen path.

Kinora – a world of possibilities at your fingertips

A free-to-access community that’s close-knit, solutions-focused, and there to lift its members up is great for everyone!
Featured: My Resources

Knowledge is power: what you need to know up front to get the most out of your NDIS plan

We’ve gathered the information you need to know from the beginning of your NDIS journey, so you can get the most out of your NDIS plan.

Unleash your inner traveller

The summer holidays are fast approaching and, whether you’re off to explore your home state, planning a trip to an Australian destination, or travelling further afield, there’s lots to consider and get excited about. After all, the anticipation of a holiday can be almost as exciting as the trip itself! But how can you get creative, so you have the supports you need to assist you on the holiday of your dreams? Read on.

How to spot a scam: tips for NDIS participants

Keeping your NDIS funding secure is important! Here's a guide to common scams designed to steal your personal information.
You may also like...
Creative producer and performer, Grace Colsey, performs with a ukulele on a dimly lit stage.

Art for everyone

Great art makes the audience feel something – and for collaborators Grace Colsey (they/them) and Jaziel ‘Jazz’ Siegertsz (he/him), they want their audience to feel seen, connected and inspired.
Three workers wearing smart clothes smile at the camera.

Ready to work

Disability Employment Service providers support people with disability to prepare for employment, find a job and work towards succeeding in their chosen path.
A person in a wheelchair uses their laptop.

Kinora – a world of possibilities at your fingertips

A free-to-access community that’s close-knit, solutions-focused, and there to lift its members up is great for everyone!

Subscribe

Stay up to date with the latest information, updates and NDIS news. Sign up to our e-news today.
For disability sector participants, supporters and advocates.
Subscribe now
For service providers, intermediaries and industry partners.
Subscribe now
NDIS provider number: 405 000 1826

My Plan Manager acknowledges the objectives of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

My Plan Manager acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia, and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to them and their cultures, and to Elders both past and present.
© My Plan Manager 2020
arrow-right linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram